Fifth-Toe Deformities Workup

Updated: May 02, 2016
  • Author: Stephen M Schroeder, DPM, FACFAS; Chief Editor: Vinod K Panchbhavi, MD, FACS  more...
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Workup

Laboratory Studies

The only laboratory studies needed are standard preoperative tests.

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Imaging Studies

Standard anteroposterior (AP), lateral, and oblique weightbearing radiographs are obtained as part of the initial workup. (See the images below.) Lesion markers can be applied over the hard and soft corns to help identify the correct underlying condyle. AP and oblique views readily show exostosis, enlarged condyles, and varus deformity of the toe. The lateral view is helpful in identifying the severity of the dorsal and plantar contractures at the metatarophalangeal joint (MTPJ) and the proximal interphalangeal joint (PIPJ).

Fifth-toe deformities. This radiograph shows a pro Fifth-toe deformities. This radiograph shows a prominent fifth-toe proximal phalanx medial condyle contacting the base of the proximal phalanx on the fourth toe, creating increased pressure and an interdigital clavi.
Fifth-toe deformities. This radiograph shows the d Fifth-toe deformities. This radiograph shows the distal phalanx of a varus-rotated fifth toe contacting the proximal phalanx on the fourth toe, creating another area of increased pressure and interdigital clavi.
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