Intercondylar Eminence Fractures Workup

Updated: Jun 26, 2020
  • Author: Brett D Owens, MD; Chief Editor: Thomas M DeBerardino, MD  more...
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Workup

Imaging Studies

Plain radiography

Plain radiography of the knee usually suffices for diagnosis of intercondylar eminence fractures. Although the anteroposterior view (AP) typically underrepresents the degree of comminution and displacement, the lateral view provides sufficient information. (See the images below.)

Tunnel view of intercondylar eminence fracture. Tunnel view of intercondylar eminence fracture.
Anteroposterior radiograph of intercondylar eminen Anteroposterior radiograph of intercondylar eminence fracture.

Computed tomography

Computed tomography (CT) usually is not necessary in skeletally immature patients unless the fracture is highly comminuted or extends into the weightbearing plateaus. CT is indicated for all adult patients to evaluate the integrity of the plateaus. (See the images below.)

Sagittal computed tomography scan of an intercondy Sagittal computed tomography scan of an intercondylar eminence fracture.
Sagittal computed tomography scan of an intercondy Sagittal computed tomography scan of an intercondylar eminence fracture.
Coronal computed tomography scan of an intercondyl Coronal computed tomography scan of an intercondylar eminence fracture.
Coronal computed tomography scan of an intercondyl Coronal computed tomography scan of an intercondylar eminence fracture.

Magnetic resonance imaging

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) usually is not necessary unless concomitant ligamentous or meniscal pathology is suspected.