Benign Neonatal Sleep Myoclonus Follow-up

Updated: Jan 02, 2015
  • Author: Marc P DiFazio, MD; Chief Editor: Ted Rosenkrantz, MD  more...
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Follow-up

Further Outpatient Care

Outpatient care of the child with a clear history of benign neonatal sleep myoclonus is within the purview of a general pediatrician. Monitoring for other neurologic or developmental concerns is included in the standard recommendations for pediatric care in the first year of life.

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Further Inpatient Care

Further inpatient care is warranted in patients with benign neonatal sleep myoclonus (BNSM) only if other risk factors for neurologic disease are evident, such as developmental concerns, deficits or abnormalities upon examination, or signs of metabolic or infectious disease. However, as mentioned above, inpatient care should be strongly considered if the movements have not been clearly identified as benign in nature by a medical provider.

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Inpatient & Outpatient Medications

No medications are indicated; in fact, treatment with benzodiazepines and other anticonvulsants may worsen the movements because they may cause sedation and sleep.

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Transfer

If clinical concern remains regarding the diagnosis, transfer the patient to a location where further neurodiagnostic testing and expertise can support the evaluation.

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Complications

No long-term complications of benign neonatal sleep myoclonus are known. However, relatively small populations have been reported, and follow-up beyond 1 year has not been reported.

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Prognosis

The prognosis is good, and no long-term residual sleep or neurobehavioral difficulties have been identified. Parents should be reassured that their child is normal and that no long-term implications are known. However, studies with follow-up longer than 1 year remain to be completed.

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