Transradial Cardiac Catheterization Periprocedural Care

Updated: Jan 24, 2014
  • Author: David H Adler, MD, FACC; Chief Editor: Eric H Yang, MD  more...
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Periprocedural Care

Equipment

Standard cardiac catheterization laboratory equipment and fluoroscopy are generally used. Specialized arterial sheaths and catheters can be used to facilitate transradial cardiac catheterization.

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Patient Preparation

The patient is brought to the catheterization laboratory in a fasting state after informed consent is obtained. A “time out” is performed, and the patient’s identity is confirmed and medical history reviewed. All team members are allowed an opportunity to voice any particular concerns regarding the case. The patient is then prepared and draped under sterile conditions.

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Anesthesia

In most cases, conscious sedation is performed. General anesthesia is rarely needed for routine cardiac catheterization and coronary intervention but may be used in some special circumstances. Local anesthesia (usually with lidocaine) is performed prior to arterial access.

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Positioning

The patient is placed in the supine position with the upper extremity extended and palm in a supine position. Frequently, an armboard is used to support the upper extremity, and a wrist support is used to stabilize and extend the wrist.

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Monitoring & Follow-up

The patient is monitored continuously during the procedure by the physician and staff. Continuous electrocardiographic monitoring, pulse oximetry, and blood pressure monitoring are performed.

The patient’s state of consciousness and pain level are also continuously assessed. A brief outpatient follow-up appointment is generally scheduled for 1-2 weeks to assess for any postprocedural problems, to review the findings of the procedure with the patient, and to evaluate the patient’s response to therapy.

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