Echinococcosis Hydatid Cyst Follow-up

Updated: Apr 08, 2015
  • Author: Enrico Brunetti, MD; Chief Editor: Burke A Cunha, MD  more...
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Follow-up

Further Outpatient Care

During treatment of patients discharged on benzimidazoles, monitor aminotransferases, WBC, RBC, and hemoglobin monthly.

Evaluate patients for ultrasonographic appearance modifications and changes in serology titers after 3 months of treatment and then for several years (at least 5).

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Further Inpatient Care

Reevaluate patients for symptom resolution and determination of cure.

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Deterrence/Prevention

In endemic areas, distribution of educational material in elementary schools regarding modes of transmission of the disease is helpful to increase knowledge about the nature and transmissibility of cystic echinococcosis.

Educational material should include information about proper disposal of sheep viscera in abattoirs and proximity to dogs and sources of transmission.

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Complications

The cysts may rupture, and the cyst content may be released into biliary or bronchial systems. This may cause infection of the cyst and an obstruction of the biliary or bronchial tree with severe clinical consequences (eg, pneumonitis, pleural effusion, pneumothorax, secondary echinococcosis of the pleural and peritoneal cavity).

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Prognosis

Prognosis is generally good and depends on the cyst location. For instance, neither surgery nor medical therapy is generally effective for bone, especially spinal, echinococcosis. Surgery to treat cardiac cysts can be risky, and there is very little experience with the use of albendazole in this site.

Sometimes after removal of a cyst, one or more new cysts may develop at a different site. A hypothesis for this is that the growth of some cysts may be inhibited by the presence of the cyst that has been removed.

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Patient Education

See Deterrence/Prevention.

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