Childhood Polyarteritis Nodosa Follow-up

Updated: Apr 25, 2018
  • Author: Donald A Person, MD, FAAP, FACR; Chief Editor: Lawrence K Jung, MD  more...
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Follow-up

Further Outpatient Care

Outpatient care in childhood polyarteritis nodosa (CPAN) is individualized for each patient.

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Further Inpatient Care

Inpatient care in childhood polyarteritis nodosa (CPAN) is individualized for each patient.

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Inpatient & Outpatient Medications

Medications are tailored to the patient's needs and disease course.

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Complications

Complications are related to the extent of disease and include digital necrosis and amputation, bowel infarction, myocardial infarction, stroke, renal failure, hepatic failure, and death. These complications relate primarily to adult polyarteritis nodosa (PAN).

Childhood polyarteritis nodosa. Gangrene of the fo Childhood polyarteritis nodosa. Gangrene of the forearm and lower leg in a 3-month-old infant.
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Prognosis

Overall prognosis is guarded. The 10-year mortality rate, even in aggressively treated patients, exceeds 20%. However, some cases remit without treatment. These statistics relate primarily to adult polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) and not childhood polyarteritis nodosa (CPAN).

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Patient Education

Patient and parent education must be individualized and coordinated by a multidisciplinary team, including a nurse, social worker, occupational therapist, physical therapist, and rheumatologist.

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