Escherichia coli (E coli) Infections Follow-up

Updated: May 18, 2017
  • Author: Tarun Madappa, MD, MPH; Chief Editor: Michael Stuart Bronze, MD  more...
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Follow-up

Further Outpatient Care

Supportive care and rehabilitation should be provided to persons with meningitis who develop neurologic sequelae.

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Further Inpatient Care

The following are indicated:

  • Supportive and symptomatic care
  • Adequate hydration and oxygenation
  • Periodic neurological test for meningitis
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Inpatient & Outpatient Medications

Most severe E coli infections warrant hospitalization. These include meningitis, pneumonia, cholecystitis/cholangitis, intra-abdominal abscess, and some cases of complicated UTI and pyelonephritis.

In patients with pyelonephritis, a switch to oral medications should be made as soon as the patient is able to tolerate oral intake.

The duration of therapy depends on the type of infection.

In case of enterohemorrhagic E coli (EHEC) diarrhea, antibiotics are contraindicated and treatment is supportive and symptomatic in nature.

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Complications

HUS may complicate EHEC infection. E coli meningitis in neonates usually results in neurological sequelae.

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Prognosis

The prognosis depends on the specific diagnosis; therefore, no generalizations can be made.

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Patient Education

Patients should be instructed on personal hygiene, such as washing hands and improving food preparation techniques.

When traveling to endemic areas, drink bottled water.

Prophylactic antibiotics may be administered for as long as 3 weeks for travelers in developing countries in whom the risk and benefits have been discussed.

Advise patients to cook meat properly to prevent hemorrhagic colitis and HUS.

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