Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation for Epicondylitis Medication

Updated: Aug 30, 2018
  • Author: Sharon J Gibbs, MD; Chief Editor: Stephen Kishner, MD, MHA  more...
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Medication

Medication Summary

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), taken orally, are the medicines of choice for ME to help control pain and any associated inflammation. NSAIDs are used on average only for the first 7-10 days of the treatment period. For the patient, taking these medications with food may help to decrease the possible gastrointestinal side effects. The following list is not meant to be comprehensive but simply to provide examples of options.

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Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

Class Summary

NSAIDs have analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antipyretic activities. Their mechanism of action is not known, but they may inhibit cyclo-oxygenase activity and prostaglandin synthesis. Other mechanisms may exist as well, such as inhibition of leukotriene synthesis, lysosomal enzyme release, lipoxygenase activity, neutrophil aggregation, and various cell-membrane functions.

Ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil, Nuprin)

DOC for mild to moderate pain. Inhibits inflammatory reactions and pain by decreasing prostaglandin synthesis.

Naproxen (Naprosyn, Aleve, Naprelan, Anaprox)

For the relief of mild to moderate pain; naproxen inhibits inflammatory reactions and pain by decreasing the activity of cyclo-oxygenase, which is responsible for prostaglandin synthesis

Etodolac (Lodine, Lodine XL)

For relief of mild to moderate pain; etodolac inhibits inflammatory reactions and pain by decreasing the activity of cyclo-oxygenase, which is responsible for prostaglandin synthesis.

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