Staphylococcal Scalded Skin Syndrome (SSSS) Follow-up

Updated: May 13, 2019
  • Author: Randall W King, MD, FACEP; Chief Editor: Jeter (Jay) Pritchard Taylor, III, MD  more...
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Follow-up

Further Inpatient Care

Further inpatient care for patients with staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSSS) involves fluid rehydration, local burn/wound care, and eradication of the underlying infection.

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Transfer

Patients with severe disease may require ICU or burn unit care.

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Deterrence/Prevention

Deterrence and prevention may involve the following:

  • Avoidance of the primary staphylococcal infection that may lead to the toxic syndrome

  • Timely treatment of established staphylococcal infections

  • Identification and treatment of asymptomatic carriers

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Complications

Complications of staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome may include the following:

  • Dehydration

  • Shock

  • Hypothermia

  • Generalized bacteremia and/or sepsis

  • Local or remote spread of infection

  • Secondary infections

  • Scarring, disability, and death

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Prognosis

Prognosis of staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSSS) in children is excellent, with complete healing typically occurring in 10 days without significant scarring.

Prognosis of staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome in adults depends on the host's immune status, the speed in initiating proper treatment, the course of the infection, and the occurrence of complications. Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome in adults carries significant rates of morbidity and mortality.

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