Iritis and Uveitis Follow-up

Updated: Aug 08, 2017
  • Author: Monalisa N Muchatuta , MD, MS; Chief Editor: Gil Z Shlamovitz, MD, FACEP  more...
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Follow-up

Further Outpatient Care

Follow-up care with an ophthalmologist within 24 hours is imperative.

In the acute phase, cases of uveitis are monitored every 1-7 days with slit-lamp examination and intraocular pressure measurements.

The ophthalmologist tapers steroids and cycloplegics. [19]

When the condition is stable, patients are monitored every 1-6 months.

The FDA recently approved two sustained-release corticosteroid vitreous implants (fluocinolone acetonide [Retisert], dexamethasone [Ozurdex]) for the treatment of inflammation-induced cases of panuveitis, intermediate uveitis, and posterior uveitis. [1] These implants preclude risks associated with systemic steroids and reduce the need for immunosuppressive agents while providing continuous therapy (approximately 30 months). [20, 21] The installation and monitoring of these treatment modalities should be managed by an ophthalmologist. 

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Complications

An acute rise in intraocular pressure secondary to pupillary block (posterior synechiae), inflammation or topical corticosteroid use is the single most important complication.

Examine all patients presenting with a red eye with a slit lamp to detect the presence of cells or flare.

Consider all other causes of a red eye [22] before uveitis is diagnosed.

An acute rise in intraocular pressure can lead to optic nerve atrophy and permanent vision loss.

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Prognosis

Generally, the prognosis for iritis and uveitis is good with appropriate treatment.

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Patient Education

For patient education resources, see the Eye and Vision Center. Also, see the patient education articles Anatomy of the Eye and Iritis.

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