Retinal Vein Occlusion (RVO) Follow-up

Updated: May 18, 2017
  • Author: Jesse Borke, MD, FACEP, FAAEM; Chief Editor: Gregory Sugalski, MD  more...
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Follow-up

Further Outpatient Care

All patients with retinal vein occlusion (RVO) require a sound and specific plan for urgent ophthalmological evaluation prior to discharge. Same-day or next-day evaluation is appropriate.

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Further Inpatient Care

Discuss decisions regarding disposition and care with the consulting ophthalmologist.

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Complications

The primary concern is vision loss. Neovascularization can result in neovascular glaucoma, vitreous hemorrhage, and, in late or severe cases, retinal detachment. Visual morbidity and blindness in RVO are due to macular edema, retinal hemorrhage, macular ischemia, and neovascular glaucoma (see Mortality/Morbidity).

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Prognosis

The primary concern is vision loss; the prognosis of RVO depends on the location of the occlusion and the degree of ischemia (see Mortality/Morbidity).

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