Postconcussive Syndrome in the ED Medication

Updated: Sep 12, 2016
  • Author: Eric L Legome, MD; Chief Editor: Trevor John Mills, MD, MPH  more...
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Medication

Medication Summary

The goals of pharmacotherapy are to provide supportive care to reduce morbidity and prevent complications. Supportive care may include the use of nonnarcotic analgesics and antiemetics.

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Analgesics, Other

Class Summary

Pain control is essential to quality patient care. It ensures patient comfort, promotes pulmonary toilet, and aids physical therapy regimens. Many analgesics have sedating properties that benefit patients who experience pain.

Acetaminophen (Acephen, Tylenol, CetafenFeverall Childrens, Ofirmev, Valorin)

Acetaminophen is the drug of choice for pain in patients with documented hypersensitivity to aspirin or NSAIDs, who have upper GI disease, or who are taking oral anticoagulants.

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Antiemetic Agents

Class Summary

Antiemetics are useful in the treatment of nausea associated with postconcussive syndrome.

Metoclopramide (Metozolv ODT, Reglan)

Metoclopramide blocks dopamine receptors in the chemoreceptor trigger zone of the central nervous system.

Ondansetron (Zofran, Zofran ODT, Zuplenz)

Ondansetron is a selective 5-HT3-receptor antagonist that blocks serotonin both peripherally and centrally. It prevents the nausea and vomiting.

Prochlorperazine (Compazine, Compro)

Prochlorperazine may relieve nausea and vomiting by blocking postsynaptic mesolimbic dopamine receptors through its anticholinergic effects and depressing the reticular activating system.

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