Facial Soft Tissue Injuries Follow-up

Updated: Aug 22, 2018
  • Author: Kyle D Parish, MD; Chief Editor: Craig C Young, MD  more...
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Follow-up

Return to Play

Return to play should be based on the location and severity of the injury, sport and position requirements, and risk of the injury causing a concomitant injury. Most athletes are able to return to play immediately after treatment on the sideline or in the training room. When making return-to-play decisions, attention should be given to whether the area in question can be protected from further injury.

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Complications

See Medical Issues/Complications for a list of potential complications.

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Prevention

The use of protective equipment, such as helmets and headgear, face masks, eye protection (shields or goggles), and mouthpieces are useful in preventing some types of facial soft-tissue injuries. Importantly, make sure the rules of the sport allow for the use of such protective equipment before recommending or providing the protective equipment.

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Prognosis

The prognosis for most facial soft-tissue injuries is good; the injuries usually heal rapidly, allowing the athlete to return to play. Knowing the expectations of the athlete and the athlete's family is important to ensure the treatment result is optimal.

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Education

Proper home wound care should be clearly explained to the patient and his or her family.

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