Parotitis Follow-up

Updated: Jan 17, 2017
  • Author: Jerry W Templer, MD; Chief Editor: Arlen D Meyers, MD, MBA  more...
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Follow-up

Further Inpatient Care

Hospitalization for parotitis is extremely unusual. Parotitis may arise in hospitalized patients who are severely ill, and it is treated as indicated above (see Treatment).

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Inpatient & Outpatient Medications

Treatment of generic parotitis involves no specific medications. Discontinue medicines with atropinelike effects and substitute other medications when feasible.

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Deterrence/Prevention

See the list below:

  • Generic deterrence is not available.
  • Adequate hydration, oral hygiene, and minimizing medications with atropine effects are helpful.
  • Immunization avoids epidemic parotitis (mumps).
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Complications

See the list below:

  • Chronic parotitis destroys the glandular elements of the salivary glands and impairs the protective functions of saliva, leading to dental infections and caries.
  • Autoimmune parotitis is associated with an increased incidence of lymphoma.
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Prognosis

The prognosis is good for all forms of parotitis. Associated or underlying diseases are the actual determinants of the prognosis.

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Patient Education

Patients with chronic parotitis are instructed to maintain scrupulous dental care. Minor swelling and discomfort are managed with local heat and massage.

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