Posttraumatic Vertigo Medication

Updated: Jul 11, 2018
  • Author: Brian E Benson, MD, FACS; Chief Editor: Arlen D Meyers, MD, MBA  more...
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Medication

Medication Summary

Acute vestibular symptoms caused by peripheral disorders may be temporarily ameliorated by antiemetics and vestibular suppressant drugs. Although vestibular neurochemistry is well understood, the treatment of vestibular disorders is primarily empirical. This is primarily the result of the lack of appropriate clinical trials that establish the efficacy, duration, and dosage of the drug.

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Benzodiazepine

Class Summary

The agents work as vestibulosuppressants and antiemetics by binding to specific receptor sites, which potentiates the effects of GABA and facilitate inhibitory GABA neurotransmission and other inhibitory transmitters.

Diazepam (Valium)

Depresses all levels of CNS possibly by increasing activity of GABA.

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Vestibulosuppressants

Class Summary

These agents decrease symptoms by masking the vertigo. They dull the brain's response to the inner ear's signals.

Meclizine (Antivert, Antrizine)

Decreases the excitability of the middle ear labyrinth and blocks conduction in the middle ear vestibular-cerebellar pathways. Effects are associated with relief of nausea and vomiting.

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Antiemetic

Class Summary

These agents are useful in the treatment of nausea caused by vertigo.

Promethazine (Phenergan)

Antidopaminergic agent effective in the treatment of emesis. Blocks postsynaptic mesolimbic dopaminergic receptors in brain and reduces stimuli to brainstem reticular system.

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