Jumper's Knee Workup

Updated: Mar 11, 2019
  • Author: Garrett Scott Hyman, MD, MPH; Chief Editor: Craig C Young, MD  more...
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Workup

Laboratory Studies

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  • The diagnosis of jumper's knee is based on the history and clinical findings. Laboratory and imaging tests are rarely necessary.

  • Laboratory studies are not indicated unless other potential causes, such as systemic, inflammatory, or metabolic disease, must be ruled out.

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Imaging Studies

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  • Radiographic imaging is not necessary to make the diagnosis of jumper's knee. Such imaging may be helpful for excluding other potential maladies.

  • Certain imaging findings do support the diagnosis. For instance, ultrasonography may show thickening and hypoechogenicity of tendon fibers. [19] Signs of hypervascularity may be seen with color Doppler ultrasonography. Plain x-ray may show a radiolucency at, or elongation of, the involved pole.

  • Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are both highly sensitive for detecting tendon abnormalities in both symptomatic and asymptomatic athletes. [20, 21, 22, 23, 24] Therefore, a significant number of false-positive results makes routine testing impractical. The advent of less expensive, portable, musculoskeletal ultrasonography units, may allow for more liberal screening in some organizations.

  • Ultrasonography combined with color or power Doppler may demonstrate peritendinous neovascularization. [21, 22] Some investigators advocate sclerosing injections that target this neovascularization as a treatment for jumper's knee. [21, 25]

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Other Tests

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  • None are required.

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Procedures

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  • None are required.

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