Genetics of Crouzon Syndrome Follow-up

Updated: May 06, 2015
  • Author: Harold Chen, MD, MS, FAAP, FACMG; Chief Editor: Maria Descartes, MD  more...
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Follow-up

Further Outpatient Care

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  • Carefully monitor postoperative complications.
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Further Inpatient Care

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  • Admit the patient with Crouzon syndrome for surgical intervention.
  • Tracheostomy may be needed for airway management.
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Transfer

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  • Transfer may be indicated for further diagnostic evaluation and surgical intervention.
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Complications

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  • Wound infections, frontal bone osteomyelitis, extradural abscess, and periorbital abscess
  • Increased intracranial pressure and postoperative hydrocephalus
  • Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak
  • Respiratory distress and obstructive sleep apnea
  • Facial nerve palsy, blindness, diplopia, and velopharyngeal incompetence
  • Optic atrophy remains an important cause of visual impairment before decompressive craniectomy.
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Prognosis

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  • Prognosis depends on malformation severity and the timing of intervention.
    • Craniosynostosis can result in brain compression and mental retardation in severely affected individuals unless relieved by early craniectomy.
    • Innovations in craniofacial surgery have enabled patients to achieve their full potential by maximizing their opportunities for intellectual growth, physical competence, and social acceptance.
  • Patients usually have a normal lifespan.
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Patient Education

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