Pediatric Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus Follow-up

Updated: Aug 15, 2018
  • Author: J Michael Klatte, MD; Chief Editor: Russell W Steele, MD  more...
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Follow-up

Transfer

Transfer to another facility should be considered for patients with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection if the required personnel are not locally available.

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Deterrence/Prevention

Rodent control measures significantly decrease disease incidence.

Preventing exposure to rodent excreta decreases disease incidence.

Laboratory personnel who handle rodents should be aware of the disease and use appropriate barrier precautions.

Standard precautions are appropriate for hospitalized patients.

Early vaccine development efforts are underway. [21]

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Complications

Congenital infection is a significant complication of the disease in pregnant women. For example, LCMV is likely an underrecognized cause of nonimmune hydrops. [6]

CNS manifestations of the disease may include encephalitis, Guillain-Barré syndrome, transverse myelitis, paralysis, seizures, and hydrocephalus. [22]

Rare complications of acquired infection include deafness, parotitis, myocarditis, and pneumonitis.

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Prognosis

Prognosis is excellent for recovery in almost all cases (except congenital or transplant-associated cases). However, patients may have a period of fatigue, dizziness, and headache that lasts weeks to months following acute disease. [23]

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Patient Education

Pregnant women should be warned about contact with rodents and rodent excreta.

Laboratory personnel should use barrier precautions when they handle rodents or are exposed to rodent excreta.

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